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Centerpointe Research

languages

Stay Involved, Don’t Opt Out

rp_Feelings.jpgSocial interaction is crucial to children learning language.  Watching a video or listening to an auditory version is not enough.  Are children becoming autistic because people in our world are becoming less and less involved?  What about a good old fashioned conversation or a satisfying read?  Being unable to interact with others is a very real problem and I can see the day when children have virtual play dates?  How removed from reality is this?  Will we all sit home and rely on clouds and the internet to keep us in touch?  Will the ethers be doing our talking?  It will no longer be necessary to read or write as computers will communicate for us just by talking and ultimately will thoughts and images not words be used to share ideas?

 rp_2269499855_31a018a8f6_m.jpg This just started out as a blog about how children need human contact to learn and ultimately to thrive.  Scarey isn’t it?  For example, someday people will not sign their names, not just because they did not learn cursive writing; but because reading and writing are no longer considered necessary.  We have done this since the dawn of the machine age and eliminating the human factor in creating things that we need and use.  Is it possible we are also eliminating the good vibrations that many skilled, dedicated craftsmen and craftswomen put into their work.

The Tower of Babble And What It Means Today

Ever since Biblical times and the Tower of Babble, the people of the world speak many different languages.  The problem isn’t just that every different language may have a different word for house, but that some languages have several different words for house and some languages may not have a word for house at all.  This is what makes translations difficult and often confusing.  Also parts of grammar can be different and so can the structure of a sentence.  So when you learn a new language you have to pay attention to a lot more than vocabulary.  Different languages use different sounds and as children grow up with a language they learn how to selectively make some sounds (the ones that predominate in their language) and not others.  This is what makes it hard for some people to learn a new language.  They may have never developed the ability to make certain sounds and/or they initially had the ability to make made certain sounds when they babbled as babies, but as they imitated those around them, the  ability to make other sounds atrophied from disuse.  This may be why certain people who learned one language as a child and who learn to speak another language

"The Tower of Babel" by Pieter Brueg...

“The Tower of Babel” by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Oil on board, 1563. The Tower of Babel symbolises the division of mankind by a multitude of tongues provided through heavenly intervention. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

as their primary language later as an adult speak with an accent.

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