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Being Self-Objective

It is very scarey when you realize that the people around you, especially the people in positions of power, are not being honest with themselves let alone other people.  Realistic self-confidence is healthy, but unrealistic self-confidence is dangerous not only for the person who has it but also for others.  The best source of knowledge a person can have is that of persons including him or herself who are willing and able to tell a person the truth no matter how unsettling.  People make mistakes; they make the wrong decisions; they overlook a vital necessary fact or source of information; and they are afraid to admit it because of the feared consequences.  People around this person collude with them because they fear the power and authority that person wields.  The higher up you go the more likely this is to happen.

This can happen in psychology and psychiatry when professionals are making (sometimes) life or death decisions.  One theory of psychotherapy is to help a person to be more honest with themselves and to be more open and honest about what they do and why they do it.  If the therapist can’t be a role model for the patient, he or she is either a fake and/or feels very insecure in the position that they have put themselves in.  No one is a saint and the person most likely to admit this is a person who others would call a saint.  The problem is that viewing the practice of psychology or psychiatry as a business does not promote the career of a mental health professional who develops wisdom and with it the requisite self-knowledge.  Materialism and the welding of power have been made more important than promoting the health and happiness of mankind.

In a perverse way, lack of self-confidence can promote dishonesty and deception.  People can make wrong decisions in an attempt to prove that they are the one in power.  They may have made a mistake but can or will not admit it and then it requires that they implement other equally wrong decisions to support the idea that they were right about the first decision or decisions

Confidence and Paranoia

Confidence and Paranoia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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