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Rules To Become A Better Person

English: Graphic on forgiveness

English: Graphic on forgiveness (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What rules do I have for being a better person?  I answered this question in a post of another website.  Some are easily remembered and others I often am only reminded of when I do not follow them.

Rules To Become A Better Person:

Don’t pass judgments on others.  This means too that I will keep a rein on any criticizing.  As the Bible says, “Let him who is without sin, cast the first stone.”

To forgive all wrongs that have been done to me and in doing so practice extreme forgiveness.  Not to hold a grudge.  Not to carry resentments against others.  Going even further this means forgiving every person whose behavior I have let effect negatively me in some way even going so far as to forgive radical terrorists.

Ask that what happens be not just for my own good but also for the good of others.

To work on keeping the word, “should”, out of my vocabulary.  That is more for my own good than the good of others.

Keeping a good attitude towards life.  Expecting the best instead of the worst.

To keep the amount of worrying that I do down to a minimum.  If I must think about potential problem, let it be in order to plan ahead.

To constantly wish for the best for others (and for myself and my loved ones).

To remember humans are not God’s only creations and to treat those in the animal, plant, and also the mineral kingdom like I would like to be treated.

To rejoice in the blessings that others receive and to be happy for them.

To put the best construction on everything.  That is to not always assign evil motives to others’ actions.

Not to let fear or anger take over my life and determine what I do and say.  Going even further, to not let fear paralyze me or anger turn into murderous rage.

To routinely meditate and practice having a quiet, peaceful mind.

Along with meditation, to keep an open mind and to never stop learning.  You will never know what you might discover.  Don’t limit yourself to studying under one teacher or mastering one spiritual discipline.

To love others as I love myself.  To bless all who I come in contact with and all who inhabit this place with me.

To love myself first and foremost and if I love myself, I will follow these rules.

To respect myself.  In order to do this, I need to act, think, and be that which I inwardly and spiritually need to be.

To practice self-discipline in everything I do since I am the only one responsible for my life and what I accomplish.

In other words, if I were God, what would I like for me to be?  With God, all things are possible; alone, I am only an imperfect being.

I have not been extremely pithy in doing this; but I will continue to think about this and revise my list as necessary.  I am not being God, I am just being what God wants me to be and it is the best thing for me.  Stay with me on my journey to self-realization and see if I can help you with yours.

Additions:

To love, respect, and honor children and (don’t forget) adolescents as well.

Above all, don’t  deliberately lie whether by omission or commission especially to yourself, your significant other, and your children when older and your parents when younger.

To not categorize people, whether by age, sexuality, cultural background, financial status,  political or religious beliefs or by the judgments of others.  I made it a point in school to not absolutely accept the judgments of teachers by what other people said.  I often found somebody’s difficult professor was a good one for me.  Also when I do put people in categories, I often am drawn into a situation where I have intimate contact with someone I categorized negatively.

Be discriminating when necessary, but not judgmental.

To consider that we all are equally loved and accepted in the eyes of God and we all have equal potential to be able to live up to what God expects of us.

 

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Rash Judgment?

A Different Church Building

A Different Church Building (Photo credit: justshootingmemories)

When my three children were very young, just toddlers, I had trouble controlling them in church as I only had “two hands” and I brought them to church by myself (and sat at the back of the church so as to cause the least amount of disruption).  After church I was shanghaied in the women’s restroom by an older woman from church (of course I still had my children with me)  and told how when she had brought her children to church when they were little that they sat still and were very quiet like she had taught them to be.  She said that her children had also grown up to be extremely successfully linking her having kept her children quiet in church to their growing up that way.  Another lady even joined in and agreed with her.  I went home feeling miserable and like not going back to the church after being treated that way.  I felt that nobody there saw that bringing them to church at their age by myself was an accomplishment in itself.  That afternoon, the lady in the restroom, who contributed her comments when I was being criticized by the other lady, called me up and sincerely apologized for any upset she might have caused me.  I did go back to church after that.  This could lead to another discussion on forgiveness; but I think I am done.

Patience that day was in short supply not only on the other woman’s side, but also on my side as a mother.  Both of  us were easily riled.  For me it started while I was trying to get us ready.  It never failed, but at least one of us would require a complete change of clothing before leaving the house.  This was after everybody had gotten dressed once for church.  Toddlers are also notorious for doing something “bad” while your attention is otherwise directed, in this case, by two other toddlers.

The lady in church was a little-bit short-sighted and also lacking in patience.  I understand that it is hard to hear the sermon when babies are crying and toddlers are screaming.  Should mothers of young children stop going to church until their children are bigger?  Children also can also be a distraction when they head down the aisle towards the altar on their own.  Do you abandon the other children?  Capture him or her and take him or her out of church to be chastized?  I remember it well.  Now it is my grandchildren doing this.

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