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Take Care of Yourself

Learning by Doing

Learning by Doing (Photo credit: BrianCSmith)

Treat yourself like you want to be treated.  Thank yourself for everything you have gotten done.  Rewards work better than punishment even for you.  Keep something beautiful where you can see it.  If you are a guy, keep something out on display that motivates you.  Or vice versa.  Make a list of all the things you have accomplished in life and review it every so often.

Remember an accomplishment for one person may not be one for another person.  For example, graduating from college can be a difficult goal for someone who works their way through college and  who started with a GED.  For another person who had an excellent grades in high school and whose parents could afford to send him or her to college, getting a college diploma might not be too difficult.  For the second person taking a minimum wage job with rotating shifts and supporting themselves might be more difficult.

If you have made a mistake or mistakes, don’t make that a focal point of your self-evaluation.  Mistakes can be a learning experience.  Don’t let one mistake stop you.  At least you can acknowledge it and then you can do something about it.  I am not encouraging you to do something stupid where you or someone might get hurt or die.  You usually learn more from mistakes than you learn from successes.

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Good Teachers, Bad Teachers

education

education (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

I was not an education major; but my graduate education in my subject matter qualified? me to teach college in that area.  My experience as a student, eventually taught me what I didn’t know when I first started school.  Naively, when I was young, I expected that my teachers not only knew their subject matter, but they also knew how to teach it.  Initially I felt that if I failed to master the subject matter, it was my fault.  Then as I became a student in high school, I learned (what almost all students learn at that point)  that you could easily get the teacher off the subject he or she was teaching and on to their “favorite” subject whether it was the Vietnam war or something else.  This was the easy way out of having to listen to a boring lecture on some subject we didn’t like anyway.  For those of us going on to college, this was a disservice as we might be expected to have learned certain things before we took certain college classes.  This idea occurred to me when I was a high school student and I began to feel at least vaguely uneasy when some students would try to distract the teacher in this way.

Problems like this continued on into graduate school where some teachers, in what was supposed to be an overview of findings in a certain area, focused only on the research that they were interested in and/or agreed with.  Sometimes they were wrong and things that needed to be covered especially if you were going to eventually work in the general or applied field were not covered or were “proven” by them to not be scientifically based.  Even worse were the professors who during the “hippie” era decided to turn the class over to the control and direction of the students who were also usually allowed to assign their own grades as well.  Scarey?  I thought so at the time.  Fortunately I had some more responsible teachers whose insights into the subject matter they taught helped me discover things about the area studied that I would not have discovered by myself or in most classes taught in that area. Thank God for good teachers.

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