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Centerpointe Research

Old age

Wake, Awake, For Night Is Flying

Wake,  Awake, For Night Is Flying.

The Meaning of Life (TV series)

We are definitely in a New Age.  More and more people have come up to me and asked me questions about the meaning of life. 

We have been stuck in a rut; but not anymore.  It is mostly older people who have asked these questions.  People have learned that to deal with life they have make changes in themselves, not others.  Some people have been caught napping.  They have been content with the way life was going for them and when it stopped working, they didn’t know where to go or what to do.

I am not a “home wrecker.´”  I only talk to those people who want to talk to me.  These people already have questions and they think that I might have the answers.  I do, but for me, not them; but if I can help I will.  When I give my ”advice”, it is “take it or leave it.”

Hamlet with Yorick's skull

Hamlet with Yorick’s skull (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I do believe in the meaningfulness of life.  There is a reason behind everything even if I don’t know it right now.  I believe in the worthiness of every human being.  Everyone has some valuable contribution to make.  We should recognize this and not just focus on the rich and famous.  These people often can do amazing things and yet, at the same time, they are very humble. 

This type of awakening can come during adolescence or young adulthood, middle age, or even at the end of life.  It depends on how much society supports such a search.  Often it requires letting go of attachments  to things people, values etc.  which were very important earlier in life.As a result of this awakening, we can change so much that we can hardly recognize ourselves.  “Who was that 30 year old woman who met her husband on a blind date after moving to a new town?

Change is a human condition.  Most people recognize the physical ones.  “Oh, did I look like that when I was in grade school?  “What will I look like in ten years?”  Some people are very afraid of change and base what they do on what they learned in the past.  Nothing remains the same; even in nature.  The cycle of birth and death is always a reality that we and other creatures have to face.  This is something that we can not effectively deny.

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Understanding and Accepting Handicaps Part II

Rest home for seniors in Český Těšín (Czeski C...

Rest home for seniors in Český Těšín (Czeski Cieszyn) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A continuation of yesterday’s post.  I also consulted in nursing homes for the disabled and for seniors who needed more care than they could get at home.  I bet you could figure this one out.  I wound up in a nursing home after a serious surgery because I wasn’t able to care for myself by myself and my husband had a weekend job that kept him away from home or sleeping most of every weekend and besides that he still had to work on the farm which was two miles from our house.  I needed to be independent in all areas when I got home even with handicapped equipment. At home, after all of my surgeries I had home health, but they could come only for a short time and it didn’t last long. I found I had very kind and competent help on all of these occasions..  I had a good roommate the first time time and later the second time after more surgery,  I spent two weeks on a rehabilitation unit.  It is not fun to accomplish your personal tasks in front of everyone, but nearly everyone was at that stage especially when they first got there.  Sometimes you have to be patient as the staff has other priorities and realize that it may have been you at another time.  I did have family visitors, not so much at the rehab unit which was thirty five miles away.

Nursing Home

Nursing Home (Photo credit: LOLren)

If I am standing still or sitting down or driving a car or on the phone, you can’t tell if I am handicapped.  My troubles started slowly and I was having problems for a long time before I went for my first surgery and they didn’t get resolved til my third surgery and I still have some residual nerve damage which effects the way I type, how large or small I write, whether I can hold on to something,  how I walk, and other things.  My family didn’t always understand; they were busy with their own lives.  One of the biggest problems I had was dropping things.  People would focus on the mess rather than helping me.  They thought I was clumsy (and stupid), not that I couldn’t help it.  Understandably at one point I got depressed. I have traveled by myself and shop and do almost all of the housework at home.  I had to adjust.  I don’t do something quickly or neatly, but I have found a way to do it on my own.  It even effected the way I eat, but that is better now.  Don’t expect miracles, but give it your best shot.  It is easier to vegetate.

Boy, did I find out what it would be like to be handicapped.  You see the world in a whole different way as a bunch of  obstacles.  In an evaluation with one surgeon, who had a medical student with him, asked my husband and son who came with me, not me, if I had any memory problems.  The only clue the surgeon had was that I came with a walker.  I didn’t dress goofy, my hair wasn’t gray (by the way I cheat) and I didn’t babble and I was as well educated as he was.

 

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