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senses

Children Are Fearfully And Wonderfully Made

A smiling baby lying in a soft cot (furniture).

A smiling baby lying in a soft cot (furniture). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Children are fearfully and wonderfully made.  You can always learn something new.  As you might know, I am teaching a child psychology class this summer.  What I am reading is reinforcing what I already knew.  Children are busy little beavers from birth and they come equipped with amazing hardware which enables them to perceive and understand their environment.

Children are fearfully and wonderfully made.  They are not just passive receptacles of stimuli.  They are programed to take it in in a certain way and then use it to form an amazing 3-D, multi-sensory model.  It forms their conception of what the world is like.  From this, they proceed to make assumptions about how things are and they use these assumptions to draw conclusions about what will happen in their environment.  This will lead to developing concepts like depth perception and object permanence.

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In Sync?

5 Senses

5 Senses (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Continuing the discussion on the senses, Without A Thought, Effortless Living, ” if you use the same sense as your conversational partner prefers when talking about how he or she perceives things,  you will be more in sync with them and you will find that he or she may be more agreeable and more likely to accept your point of view.  This could be a very good sales technique and it is also used in establishing rapport in therapy or inducing trances, especially in a conversational style of induction.  In any relationship, paying attention to such things would give you a clue as to the type of activity or gift someone would like.  How about, “That smells good,” for example.  Makes you think of fresh baked goods or scented candles or perfume or aftershave.

As you grow psychologically and focus more on your direct experience (Ah la mindfulness), you will probably become more aware of your own sensory experiences.  Colors may become brighter; sounds, more noticeable; smells, more attractive or more obnoxious.  You may become able to create a more realistic experience when you imagine a restful scene when using relaxation techniques.  Start with your area of strength, usually the one sense that you use the most when describing things.  By doing so, you can get in sync with yourself and have a more intense experience when you do this.  The more of this you do, the better your visualizations (for want of a better word that would include the use of all the senses).

The Collection ('N Sync album)

The Collection (‘N Sync album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Without A Thought, Effortless Living

Coffee table book

Coffee table book (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Breastfeeding symbol

Breastfeeding symbol (Photo credit: Topinambour)

Can you enjoy, truly enjoy, something without dissecting or analyzing it.  For some mothers breastfeeding is such a moment.  Do you actually look forward to a moment when you are doing a task that is so routine, you don’t even need to think about it.

Lavishly illustrated coffee table books hit the spot for me.  I can do all the looking I want and there is nobody telling me to hurry up or move on.  When I make the occasional excursion out by myself, (if I have time) I make it a point to “window shop” in a new store, one that I haven’t been in yet.  I am very visual.  That’s how I see things.

For some it is a long luxurious hot soak in a bath tub.  For others, it is a shower using all the water you want.  Then you might like to crawl between sheets in a freshly made bed.  Most or all of these seemingly mindless experiences involve the senses and you don’t have to think about them to enjoy them.

You can usually tell what sense the person prefers by the words they use to express themselves such as, “I can see that,” or “Hear me out,” or “How does that make you feel?”

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Seeing Things as They Really Are

5 Senses

5 Senses (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So many of us are too busy thinking of what to do or say next that we do not pay attention to what is happening in front of us.  When we really see and hear this and pick up on what  is being communicated or what is really going on, we can make better decisions then if we jump to conclusions and react to what we think is going on before we give it a chance to unfold.

Recently after spending time learning to meditate in the past year or two, I have noticed that I am more in the moment when something is going on in front of me and notice things that I failed to notice before.  Too often we see what we think we are seeing even if that is not what is going on.  The act of perception is often a filter which keeps us from taking in what is really going on.

We spend too much time thinking when we ought to be receiving information from our senses which we can then use to create a picture of what is going on when we have all the information.  Endless mind chatter can block and/or distort information coming in from our senses.  If we don’t have the whole picture,  how can we come to accurate conclusions.

Have you ever been so angry that you couldn’t see straight.  Have you then been mistakenly rude to someone who made an innocent remark?  You weren’t thinking clearly were you?

When you are not overcome with emotion and your mind is quiet, you can focus on what is going on around you.  You might be surprised at what you might have been missing.  Others who are able to do this often have an advantage when it comes to understanding and interpreting what is going on around them.

 

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